Drei Zinnen / Tre Cime Nature Park

Research and data gathering

Studien und Erhebungen
Rhaetian Alps poppy

Nature parks are sizeable areas comprising a combination of untouched and man-made landscapes that are rich in flora, fauna and habitats. As these areas also contain unusual geological elements and an extremely broad range of topological features, they are often studied by scientists.

The insights gained from such research and the data gathered for them is crucial when it comes to ensuring sustainable use of nature parks over the long term.

Tourism in Drei Zinnen / Tre Cime Nature Park

Tourism in Drei Zinnen / Tre Cime Nature Park
Hiker in Drei Zinnen / Tre Cime Nature Park

In 1990 and 1991 Institut isafa – comunicazioni di ricerca (Istituto sperimentale per l’assestamento forestale e per l’agricoltura) in Villazzano (TN) conducted a survey and count of visitors to Drei Zinnen / Tre Cime Nature Park, with the goal of carrying out a detailed analysis of tourism in the park. To this end, data concerning the park’s actual visitor numbers and flows were gathered, and a survey concerning the behavioral patterns and activities of park visitors and their attitudes toward the park was also conducted. The study was published by the opinion research institute appolis from Bozen / Bolzano in a slightly modified form in 2008.

Potential and current distribution of rock ptarmigan, rock patridge, and black grouse in Drei Zinnen / Tre Cime Nature Park; the park’s suitability as a wood grouse habitat

Potential and current distribution of rock ptarmigan, rock patridge, and black grouse in Drei Zinnen / Tre Cime Nature Park; the park’s suitability as a wood grouse habitat
Snow grouse

At the behest of the provincial office for nature parks, from 1998 to 2001 Dr. Rainer Ploner and Dr. Lothar Gerstgrasser conducted a study of grouse and rock partridge in  Drei Zinnen / Tre Cime Nature Park. Their goals were to learn more about and to map the potentially suitable habitats for rock partridge and species of grouse that are found above the timber line. Based on indirect evidence, surveys of individuals familiar with the site, and random sample controls using pointer dogs, the actual distribution of the various species was determined and was compared with the potential data. In addition, the extent to which the park’s forests are suitable black grouse habitats was investigated. The findings obtained from potential and current distribution maps may prove to be a key decision making tool for assessing possible park related measures.