Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park

Research and data gathering

Studien und Erhebungen
Green whip snake

Nature parks are sizeable areas comprising a combination of untouched and man-made landscapes that are rich in flora, fauna and habitats. As these areas also contain unusual geological elements and an extremely broad range of topological features, they are often studied by scientists.

The insights gained from such research and the data gathered for them is crucial when it comes to ensuring sustainable use of nature parks over the long term.

Study of the fauna in Fanes-Sennes-Prags / Fanes-Senes-Braies Nature Park and Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park

Study of the fauna in Fanes-Sennes-Prags / Fanes-Senes-Braies Nature Park and Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park
Cuckoo

This study was conducted from 1995 to 1997 by the Wildlife Biology Society, Munich at the behest of the provincial office for nature parks, with the goal of gaining insight into the animal populations in these two nature parks. The study contains data concerning the distribution of the species concerned and their phenological patterns (periodically recurring developmental manifestations in nature over the course of a year, one example being the coloration of the ptarmigan’s feathers). In addition, the species concerning which we currently lack knowledge and need to learn more were listed. The study report is in German.

Owls and codgers in Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park

Owls and codgers in Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park
Pygmy owl

In 1997 the provincial office for nature parks commissioned a study concerning the distribution of nocturnal animals of prey in Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park. Over a two year period scientists Renato Sascor, Roberto Maistri and Stefano Noselli made records of the calls of these birds at night, while during the day they investigated the landscape structure and vegetation of the study areas as well as traces of the birds such as pellets, fecal residues, and nesting holes. The study revealed the presence of six species of owl, whereby Tengmam’s owls and Eurasian pygmy owls were found to be relatively common, Tawny owls were found to occur in lower numbers than expected, long-eared owls were found to be rare, little owls were hardly seen at all, and there were no sightings of scops owls.

Bats in the peripheral areas of Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park

Bats in the peripheral areas of Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park
Bat

The occurrence of bats in the environs of Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park was first investigated by Oskar Niederfriniger from 1991 to 1998 (see Niederfriniger 1994, 2001, 2002, 2003) as part of a province wide study. In 2007, the provincial office for nature parks commissioned a second detailed study, by Oskar Niederfriniger and Dr. Christian Drescher, of the manner in which bats use the habitats at the periphery of Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park. The purpose of the study was to gather sufficient data to allow for the protection of bats.

Distribution area and habitat description of hazel grouse and wood grouse in Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park

Distribution area and habitat description of hazel grouse and wood grouse in Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park
Black grouse

In 2001 and 2006, Dr. Silvano Mattedi investigated the distribution and habitat use of hazel grouse and wood grouse in Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park . Inasmuch as grouse are widely regarded as indicator species for habitat quality, they are ideal objects of study for projects that aim for the integration of nature conservation and other forms of land use such as forestry tourism and recreation. Moreover, the European Union Bird’s Directive classifies the wood grouse as an extremely endangered species and thus one in need of priority protection. Many species of grouse are extremely habitat dependent and are thus highly sensitive to any change in their habitat.

Vegetation studies under the Natura 2000 management plan

Vegetation studies under the Natura 2000 management plan
Ferns and mushrooms

Pursuant to the Natura 2000 management plan, investigations were conducted concerning the vegetation at Weißensee / Lago Bianco, Langes Moos / Palude longa and Gampen-Moore / Torbiere Gampen near Pezzole Alm. This research shed light on the current status of wetland biotopes and how they might potentially evolve. Samples of lichen in selected forest habitats were also collected. Lichen are key ecological indicators for the determination of forest ecosystem naturalness and for the assessment of sustainable-development measures such as maintenance of a defined percentage of forest deadwood.

Dragonflies in Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park

Dragonflies in Trudner Horn / Monte Corno Nature Park
Beautiful demoiselle

Dragonflies are mainly characterized by their unusual wing structures comprising bilateral sets of two wings that can move independently of each other and allow the insects to abruptly change direction, hover in the air, and in some species even fly backward. Dragonflies, which are able to fly at speeds of up to 50 kilometers an hour, are mainly found near bodies of water, as their larvae need water as a habitat in order to survive. In the summer of 2008 Dr. Franziska Werth, Dr. Alex Festi and Dr. Tanja Nössing investigated the distribution of dragonflies in various wetland habitats at nature park Trudner Horn / Monte Corno. The findings of their study served as a basis for the elaboration of water habitat preservation and optimization measures.

  • Click here to download a pamphlet summarizing the study’s findings titled “Die Libellen in den Naturparks Trudner Horn und Rieserferner-Ahrn” / “Le libellule nei parchi naturali Monte Corno e Vedrette di Ries-Aurina”.